Home » Extinction Events: Snowball Earth, Permian-Triassic Extinction Event, Holocene Extinction, Cretaceous-Tertiary Extinction Event, Nemesis by Books LLC
Extinction Events: Snowball Earth, Permian-Triassic Extinction Event, Holocene Extinction, Cretaceous-Tertiary Extinction Event, Nemesis Books LLC

Extinction Events: Snowball Earth, Permian-Triassic Extinction Event, Holocene Extinction, Cretaceous-Tertiary Extinction Event, Nemesis

Books LLC

Published August 31st 2011
ISBN : 9781157708032
Paperback
82 pages
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 About the Book 

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 81. Chapters: Snowball Earth, Permian-Triassic extinction event, Holocene extinction, Cretaceous-TertiaryMorePlease note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 81. Chapters: Snowball Earth, Permian-Triassic extinction event, Holocene extinction, Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction event, Nemesis, Triassic-Jurassic extinction event, Quaternary extinction event, Chicxulub crater, Toba catastrophe theory, K-T boundary, Late Devonian extinction, Yellowstone Caldera, Tollmanns hypothetical bolide, Silverpit crater, Cat gap, Great Oxygenation Event, Ordovician-Silurian extinction event, Carboniferous Rainforest Collapse, Shiva crater, Wilkes Land crater, Lau event, End-Ediacaran extinction, Boltysh crater, Vredefort crater, Raven Ridge, Cenomanian-Turonian boundary event, Olsons Extinction, Marine regression, Medea Hypothesis, Fern spike, Middle Miocene disruption, Huronian glaciation, Ireviken event, Cambrian-Ordovician extinction event, Dresbachian, Eocene-Oligocene extinction event, Aptian extinction, Toarcian turnover, Fenambosy Chevron, Mulde event, Rahjamal Traps. Excerpt: The Permian-Triassic (P-Tr) extinction event, informally known as the Great Dying, was an extinction event that occurred 251.4 Ma (million years ago), forming the boundary between the Permian and Triassic geologic periods. It was the Earths most severe extinction event, with up to 96% of all marine species and 70% of terrestrial vertebrate species becoming extinct It is the only known mass extinction of insects. Some 57% of all families and 83% of all genera were killed. Because so much biodiversity was lost, the recovery of life on Earth took significantly longer than after other extinction events. This event has been described as the mother of all mass extinctions. Researchers have variously suggested that there were from one to three distinct pulses, or phases, of extinction. There are several proposed mechanisms for the extinctions- the earlier phase was likely due to gradual environmental change, while the latter...